Open API for JSON-based custom services in AX 7

If you’re familiar with SOAP web services, you likely know that they use Web Services Description Language (WSDL) to document what operations a service provide, what parameters they accept, what they return and so on. This information can be used to generate proxy classes, which you can use to communicate with remote systems simply by …

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Discovery of JSON-based custom services in AX 7

If you download AX integration samples from GitHub, you’ll see (in JsonConsoleApplication project) that you can call JSON-based custom services by code like this: var request = HttpWebRequest.Create(ClientConfiguration.Default.UriString + "api/services/UserSessionService/AifUserSessionService/GetUserSessionInfo"); request.Headers[OAuthHelper.OAuthHeader] = OAuthHelper.GetAuthenticationHeader(); request.Method = "POST"; request.GetResponse(); It will call the operation and return its return value as JSON: { "$id":"1", "AOSLocaleName":"en-US", "AXLanguage":"EN-US", "Company":"DAT", "CompanyTimeZone":58, …

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Integration with AX 7 in cloud

I’m getting a lot of questions along the lines of “how on earth can we integrate our on-premises systems with AX 7 running in cloud?”, therefore let me share some of my thoughts. The first important point to realize is that “to integrate” means many different things, so there is no single solution for it. …

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Flow and Logic Apps

I see a lot of confusion regarding Microsoft Flow and Logic Apps, so let me very briefly explain what they are and when you should use them. First of all, you should realize that they’re very closely related. For example, this is the designer for Flow: And this is the designer for Logic Apps: They’re …

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